American Dental10 Locations

Common Pediatric Dental Problems
Ankylosis
Ankylosis

This refers to a tooth or teeth (primary or permanent) that have become 'fused' to the bone, preventing it or them from moving 'down' with the bone as the jaws grow. This process can affect any teeth in the mouth, but it is more common on primary first molars and teeth that have suffered trauma (typically the incisors). Treatment can vary depending on the degree of severity of the ankylosis (how 'sunken into the gums' a tooth may appear). The degree of severity usually will vary depending on how early the process started, and as a general rule, the earlier it starts, the more severe the ankylosis becomes with age. Several considerations must be taken before any treatment is provided, and your dentist will discuss all the risks and benefits of each treatment option.

Enamel Fluorosis
Enamel Fluorosis

In severe cases of enamel fluorosis, the appearance of the teeth is marred by discoloration or brown markings. The enamel may be pitted, rough, and hard to clean. In mild cases of fluorosis, the tiny white specks or streaks are often unnoticeable.

Mucocele
Mucocele

This is a common benign lesion in children and adolescents that results from the rupture of the excretory ducts (very small tubes) that deliver saliva to the top tissues of the lips. More than 75% of mucocele are located on the lower lip and their size and color may vary, however, they tend to be relatively painless for the most part. Most of the time, patients report that these 'bumps' grow until they burst spontaneously, leaving small ulcers that heal within a few days. This does not mean the lesion is gone, as they often tend to re-appear weeks or months later. Most dentists will recommend surgical treatment for these lesions.

Pulpotomy
Pulpotomy

Baby teeth that have large caries (cavities) and some degree of pain occasionally require that the 'coronal' (top) portion of that tooth's nerve be removed before a filling or a crown (preferably) is placed. The main goal of this procedure is to preserve the baby tooth, since baby teeth help to maintain adequate room for the permanent teeth. Pulpotomies have published success rates that range from 60% to 90% and represent a good and reliable way to save a badly decayed baby tooth.

10 Convenient Regional Dental Super-centers

2535 Grand Concourse
(718) 365-4900
241 W. 30th St.
(917) 351-0200
250 Fulton Ave.
(516) 481-9700
6180 Jericho Tpke.
(631) 499-0040
1302 Kings Hwy.
(718) 376-6700
1659 Richmond Ave.
(718) 983-6300
180 Broadway
(516) 433-1800
40-20 Main St.
(718) 429-8300
2233 Caton Ave.
(718) 858-9211
200 Hamilton Ave.
(914) 949-6800